Grammar » B1+ Grammar lessons and exercises » Quantifiers – all, most, both, either, neither, any, no, none » Page 3
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  • Quantifiers – all, most, both, either, neither, any, no, none

    Exercise 3

    Fill in the gaps in the dialogues with words from the list.

    most of     every     any      anything     anyone     both of     no-one     all     neither     either     no     none

    EXAMPLE:

    A: Have you seen any of my friends?

    B: No, sorry. I’ve seen no-one .

    Dialogue 1

    A: We've found something illegal in your bag. Could 1 have put 2 illegal in your luggage?

    B: No, that's not possible. I packed 3 the things myself.

    Dialogue 2

    A: Sorry, madam, but 4 drinks are allowed in the museum.

    B: But I've just bought it from the vending machine you have outside.

    A: I'm sorry. 5 you drink it before going in or you put it in this bin.

    Dialogue 3

    A: Why don't you offer more vegetarian choices in your restaurant?

    B: Because 6 the people who come here aren't vegetarians.

    Dialogue 4

    A: Please, my wife and I would like some water.

    A: Do 7 you want water to drink?

    B: Yes, please.

    A: May I suggest trying the white wine?

    B: No, thanks, 8 of us drink alcohol.

    Dialogue 5

    A: How many available seats do you have?

    B: I'm sorry, sir. I'm afraid that 9 .

    A: Are you saying that 10 seat has been taken?

    B: Yes, sir, all of them.


     

  • All, most – Grammar chart

    A grammar chart explaining the use of quantifiers "all" and "most" with examples and different structures such as "all + noun," "all of + object pronoun," "most + noun," and "most of the + noun."

    Download full-size image from Pinterest

    All

    All + noun / all (of) the/my/etc. + noun / all + object pronoun

    We can use all + noun to talk about all things or people in general or all (of) the/my/etc. + noun to talk about specific things or people.

    • All plants need water.
    • All (of) the plants in the garden were burned.

    We can also use all of + object pronoun.

    • All of them were at the event. 
    • She invited all of us to dinner.

    Mid position

    We can also use all in mid position. That is before the main verb or after the verb be when it is the main verb. Or after the first auxiliary verb when there are auxiliary verbs.

    • We all went.
    • They were all happy.
    • We can all be there when she arrives.

    All + time expression

    We say all day, all night, all month, all year, etc. to mean ‘the entire day/night/month/etc.’

    • I studied all day and all night.
    • We’ll be here all week

    Note that we don’t use an article or a preposition when we use all + time expression.

    • We didn’t see them in all the day. blank
    • We didn’t see them all day. blank

    Everything/everybody + verb (NOT all + verb)

    You shouldn’t use all on itself as the subject of the sentence.

    • All is big in the U.S. blank
    • Everything is big in the U.S. blank
    • All were at the party. blank
    • Everybody was at the party. blank

    Most

    Most + noun / most of the/my/etc. + noun / most of + object pronoun

    We can use most + noun to talk about all people or things in general or most of the/my/etc. + noun to talk about specific people or things.

    • Most people trust science.
    • Most of the people at the club were underage.

    We can also use most of + object pronoun.

    • Most of us come from poor families. 
    • They arrested most of them.

    Both, either, neither – Grammar chart

    A grammar chart explaining the use of quantifiers "both," "either," and "neither" with examples and different structures such as "both A and B," "either + singular noun," and "neither + plural noun."

    Download full-size image from Pinterest

    Both

    Both A and B

    We can use both A and B to refer to all the elements in a group of two things.

    • Both Jane and Margaret passed the exam.

    Both (of the) + noun / both of + object pronoun

    We can also use both (of the) + noun or both of + object pronoun to refer to two things or people.

    • Both (of the) students passed the exam.
    • Both of them passed the exam.

    Mid position

    Both, like all, can be used in mid position.

    • We both went. 
    • They were both happy. 
    • We can both be there when she arrives. 

    Either

    We use either to refer to a choice between two possibilities.

    Either A or B

    • They’ll be here either on Monday or on Tuesday.
    • Either Carla or her sisters is/are going to be there when you arrive. 

    Either + singular noun

    • Either candidate is a good option.

    Either of the + plural noun

    • Either of the candidates is/are a good option.

    Either + object pronoun

    • Either of them is/are a good option.
    • I don’t like either of them.

    Either as a pronoun (not followed by noun)

    • ‘Would you like tea or coffee?’ ‘Either is fine.’

    Note that when we use either in the subject, we can always use a singular verb, but the verb can also be plural if it appears after a plural noun.

    Neither

    Neither is a negative word that we use only with positive verbs to mean ‘not either of two things or people’.

    Neither A nor B

    • I have neither the patience nor the time to wait here all morning. 
    • Neither Jack nor his mates is/are a good influence for you. 

    Neither + singular noun

    • Neither candidate is a good option.

    Neither of the + plural noun

    • Neither of the candidates is/are a good option.

    Neither of + object pronoun

    • Neither of them is/are a good option.
    • I like neither of them.

    Neither as a pronoun (not followed by noun)

    • ‘Do you like tea or coffee?’ ‘Neither.’

    Note that when we use neither in the subject, we can always use a singular verb, but the verb can also be plural if it appears after a plural noun.

    No, any, none – Grammar chart

    A grammar chart explaining the use of quantifiers "any," "no," and "none" with examples and different structures such as "any + noun," "no + noun," and "none of + noun/pronoun."

    Download full-size image from Pinterest

    No vs any

    We use no + noun in affirmative sentences, and we use any + noun in negatives and questions.

    • I have no friends.
    • I don’t have any friends. 
    • Do you have any friends?

    Any as a pronoun

    We can also use any as a pronoun, i.e. not followed by a noun.

    • ‘Is there any milk left?’ ‘No, there isn’t any.’

    Any in affirmative sentences

    We can also use any in affirmative sentences when it means ‘one or some, but it is not important which’.

    • You can come any weekend.
    • Any idiot would know how to use this phone.

    None

    We use none as a pronoun, i.e. not followed by a noun.

    • ‘How many friends do you have?’ ‘None.’

    We can also use none of + noun/pronoun

    • None of the students is from France.
    • None of them is from France.
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