Exercise 3

Complete the text with the future continuous or the future perfect of the verbs in brackets. Do NOT use contracted forms

Technology is advancing so fast that by the year 2050 who knows what new technologies we 1 (invent). It is quite likely that by 2050 we 2 (use up) most of the earth's natural resources and so we 3 (rely) on wind and solar power. As there will be a shortage of energy, it is quite likely that at that time scientists 4 (try) to find a way for us to live outside the earth. Before the end of the next century, it's possible that people 5 (live) in cities on the Moon or perhaps in cities on the seabed.

By 2050 it's possible that scientists 6 (already/discover) how to cure diseases such as cancer and, due to the advancement of genetic engineering, maybe hereditary diseases passed down from generation to generation 7 (disappear) forever. It is quite possible that by 2050 life expectancy 8 (increase) to 100 and that we 9 (enjoy) a healthier existence.

Another area likely to have been affected by technology in the year 2050 is education. Many students 10 (study) online from their homes.


 

 

Future continuous – grammar chart

 
Future continuous

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Future continuous: use

 

Actions in progress in the future

 
We use the future continuous for situations or actions that will be in progress at a certain time in the future.

  • This time next week, we‘ll be travelling to Paris. 
  • Tomorrow at 10, you‘ll be doing your exam. 
  • When you get off the train, I‘ll be waiting on the platform. 
  • In two months’ time, we‘ll be lying on the beach and drinking a mojito. 

 

Future arrangements (=present continuous)

 
We use the future continuous instead of the present continuous for future events that have already been planned or decided.

  • We’ll be coming next weekend.
  • We’ll be leaving at 8 a.m. tomorrow.

 

Future continuous: signal words

 
As you can see in the examples above, we often use the future continuous with time expressions such as:

  • This time … (this time tomorrow, this time next week, etc.)
  • When …
  • At + time … (at 7 tomorrow, at midday next Monday, etc.)
  • In … (in 2 weeks, in 3 months, in 5 years, etc)
  • In …’ time (in 2 weeks’ time, in 3 months’ time, in 5 years time, etc)

 

Future perfect – grammar chart

 
Future perfect

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Future perfect: use

 

Actions finished in the future

 
We use the future perfect for actions that will be finished before certain time in the future.

  • By 2050, researchers will have found a cure for cancer.
  • By this time next year, I’ll have graduated.
  • When you arrive tomorrow, we’ll have left.

 

Duration until some time in the future

 
We use the future perfect to talk about the duration of a situation until a certain time in the future.

  • By the time I leave, I will have been in England for 6 months.
  • In 2 years, we will have been married for 20 years.

 

Future perfect: signal words

 
As you can see in the examples above, we often use the future perfect with time expressions such as:

  • By … (by tomorrow, by next week, by the end of the year, etc.)
  • By this time … (by this time tomorrow, by this time next week, etc.)
  • In … (in 2 weeks, in 5 years, etc.)
  • When/Before …

By + time expression means ‘not later than’, ‘at’ or ‘before’ certain time.